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Saisons & épisodes Les résumés de tous les épisodes de The Grand Prix Collection

S255E01 1970: Uncrowned Champion 00/00/0000 1970 was the year of transition in Grand Prix racing; the season that pitched the old guard against a feisty new breed of racers intent on pushing Formula One forward into the new decade. Nothing symbolised this battle more than the cars used by top contenders: Jackie Ickx's Ferrari 312B relied on brute force to compensate for its outdated styling, whereas Jochen Rindt's Lotus 72 showed that radical aerodynamics represented a brave and (potentially) faster way forward. And with the technological battles came a fascinating season's racing. Jackie Stewart was the defending champion but took nothing for granted. When different drivers won the first four races, Stewart, and the world, knew that the Championship was wide open. Thrilling battles ensued until triumph and tragedy came together in one fatal collision: on the 5th of September 1970 Championship leader Jochen Rindt died during practice at Monza. He was to become the sport's first posthumous champion.
S255E02 1971: Great Scot! 00/00/0000 1971. This was the year of the Stewart-Tyrrell double-act. But it wasn't as clear-cut at the start of the season. Ferrari was still the team to beat, and the brute force of the V-12 engine threatened to destroy everything in its wake. It was the addition of Stewart and Tyrrell into the Championship that challenged the balance of power. It made for an epic season that pitted mechanical muscle against driving skill. And as the season progressed Stewart and Tyrrell developed a magical formula that combined radical aerodynamics with Stewart's sublime talent. It became clear that the might of the prancing horse could (and would) be tamed.
S255E03 1972 00/00/0000
S255E04 1973: Reign of Stewart 00/00/0000 1973 Emerson Fittipaldi was the reigning champion. But there was no question regarding the intention of his biggest rival, Jackie Stewart, who had lost his title to the big Brazilian and wanted it back. It was Fittipaldi who laid down the gauntlet, winning three out of the first four races. However, Stewart refused to buckle under pressure, and consistent displays of driving genius with the Tyrrell wondercar brought him right back into contention. By the halfway point of the season, Stewart led the Championship by a single point. From this, he turned on the style, transforming his slender lead into something that was simply unassailable. He retired from Grand Prix racing at the end of the season as champion, with his position as one of the all-time greats assured. There was more to the season than the battle between the big guns. Safety regulations made a big impact on car design, but not on safety, as fatalities unfortunately returned to the championship.
S255E05 1974 00/00/0000
S255E06 1975: Lauda and Ferrari No.1 00/00/0000 1975 was the year the prancing horse got its spring back. The early decade had been a challenging period for Ferrari, as they struggled to find a body shape that would do justice to the brute force of the V12 engine. Enter Niki Lauda and his brand new car - the Ferrari 312T; an irresistible combination that would prove to be unstoppable. But it wasn't plain sailing all the way. 1975 was an unsettled season full of disagreements and problems that saw four races stopped prematurely for safety reasons and the Canadian GP cancelled over money issues. Lauda shone through these gloomy times, winning four out of five mid-season GPs to take the championship away from his closest rival, defending champion Emerson Fittipaldi. When he secured the championship/constructor double in front of a frenzied Italian crowd at Monza, the world knew that Ferrari was back.
S255E07 1976: Hunt for the Title 00/00/0000 1976 saw reigning Champion Niki Lauda start as the favourite in his Ferrari, as nearest rival Emerson Fittipaldi made the patriotic switch from McLaren to the Brazilian funded Copersucar team. This left a hole at McLaren, filled by the ambitious, British hopeful, James Hunt, to set the scene for a dramatic season of racing. Tyrrell stole the limelight early on in the season, not for their results, but through the unveiling of their revolutionary six-wheeled P34. Hunt quickly adapted to life at McLaren and, unfazed by Lauda's early dominance, continued to pick up valuable points and podium finishes. 1976 will probably be best remembered for Lauda's horrific accident at the Nurburgring that nearly ended his life and saw him rushed to hospital with major burns. His resilience and dedication to racing saw him make a remarkable recovery, returning six weeks later to ensure a thrilling climax to a season that ended with only one point separating 1st and 2nd place in the championship. Again it was the last eventful race in Japan that decided the title.
S255E08 1977 00/00/0000
S255E09 1978: Magic Mario 00/00/0000 1978 Ferrari and Lauda had now gone their separate ways despite winning the championship together in '77. Lauda moved to Brabham and Ferrari took on the young Gilles Villeneuve. Frank Williams and Patrick Head formed Williams Grand Prix Engineering, mounting their first title challenge with Alan Jones in the driving seat. Tyrrell had reverted back to four wheels from their radical six-wheeled P34, and this year it was Brabham who turned heads with the introduction of their BT-46B 'fan car'. On its first Grand Prix in Sweden it took first place only to be banned from future competition by the FIA. The Lotus Type 79 'wing car' was regarded as the best outfit, piloted by the experienced pairing of Mario Andretti and Ronnie Peterson. The Lotus team capitalised on their advantage and with two rounds left to race, it was only Peterson that had any chance of catching Andretti. Formula One still hadn't made safety a paramount concern, and at Monza it paid the price. An early crash left Peterson with fatal injuries, delivering another blow to Formula One and reaffirming the need for tighter controls. This tragedy gave Andretti the title and despite not finishing at Watkins Glen and coming 10th in Montreal, Lotus had secured enough points to take the constructors title by 28 points
S255E10 1979: Maranello mastery 00/00/0000 1979 saw Carlos Reutemann move to partner Mario Andretti at Lotus as Jody Scheckter took his seat at Ferrari. Wolf filled the gap left by Scheckter with James Hunt, and McLaren gave John Watson a drive in place of Hunt. The type 79 'wing car' had offered Lotus a great advantage in aerodynamic grip during the previous season. But for this year, many of the teams had incorporated the technology into their designs. Over the first two races Ligier appeared to have made up the most ground with Jacques Laffite taking the victories. In round 3, Ferrari laid down the team's intentions, giving the new 312T4 model its successful debut. As the season progressed Williams' reliability improved and Alan Jones demonstrated the team's pace, winning four out of the last six races. For Williams and Jones it was too little too late. The consistent performances from the Ferrari team had paid off, and despite only having three victories throughout the season, Scheckter took the title. 1979 also saw Formula One say its goodbyes to two of the decade's greatest characters: James Hunt and Niki Lauda. Hunt quit racing after the Monaco Grand Prix claiming to be fed up with Formula One, and Lauda retired at the penultimate Grand Prix in Montreal.

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